Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

PHYS 100 — Physical Science for Elementary Education Majors (3)
An introduction to the scientific method and some major topics in physics, including forces and motion, energy, gravity, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and optics. Hands-on activities and projects are an important part of this course which aims to prepare future educators to bring science activities into their classrooms. 3 lecture hours and 1 75-minute activity period.

PHYS 108 — Applied Biophysics (4)
Introductory physics designed specifically for ATEP majors and relevant to the experiences and activities of the sports medicine professional. The course is designed to increase understanding of motion and function of the human body and therapeutic techniques used when the body is not moving or functioning well. 3 lecture hours, 1 problem hour and 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS 111 — General Physics I (4)
The first semester of a two-semester sequence focusing on mechanics. The course provides a calculus-based introduction to the laws of motion of Galileo and Newton, the fundamentals of energy conservation, oscillatory motion, gravitation and orbital motion. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 125 or MATH 129 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture hours, 1 problem hour and 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS 112 — General Physics II (4)
The second semester of a two-semester sequence focusing on waves, light and electromagnetism. The course provides a calculus-based introduction to the properties of waves, geometric and wave optics, electric fields, basic electric circuits, and magnetism. Prerequisite: PHYS 111 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture hours, 1 problem hour, and 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS 231 — Modern Physics (4)
An introduction to modern physics. Topics include special relativity, quantum physics, waves and particles, and atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: MATH 130 and PHYS 112 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours and 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS 233 — Electronics I (4)
Introduction to basic electronic circuits and devices, with a major emphasis on solid state circuitry. Topics include AC-DC circuits and electrical measuring devices, power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators, operational amplifiers and switching and timing devices. Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: MATH 238 or permission of instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours and 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS 234 — Electronics II (4)
Introduction to the analysis and synthesis of electronic circuits for signal processing, using passive elements as well as modern active devices including solid-state diodes and transistors. The design of both digital and analog circuitry will be discussed, and the applications and limitations of these circuits and devices will be addressed. Prerequisite: PHYS 233 or permission of instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours and 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS 241 — Statics (3)
A study of the basic principles of mechanics applicable to rigid bodies in equilibrium, the kinematics and kinetics of particle motion and an application of these principles to the solution of a variety of practical and more complicated problems.
Prerequisite: MATH 130 and PHYS 112 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 242 — Mechanics of Solids (3)
An introduction to the concepts of stress and strain, material properties, deflections of bars under axial, torsional and bending loads, statically indeterminate problems, and stress transformations. Prerequisite: MATH 130 and PHYS 241 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 285 — Fundamental Astrophysics (3)
An introduction to orbital mechanics, astrophysical processes in stellar atmospheres and interiors, stellar evolution and the interstellar medium, black holes, galactic structure, active galaxies, and quasars. Prerequisite: PHYS 231 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 290 — Special Topics (3)
A sophomore level forum for a variety of current topics in physics. Students will be expected to supplement the traditional classroom work with additional research material in order to become familiar with the selected topic. The topics can be chosen to augment several major programs depending upon demand. Permission of the department chairperson is required.

PHYS 296, 297 — Physics Research I, II (0-2)
Independent research into a problem of current physical interest under the supervision of a Chemistry or Physics faculty member. A written report is required. Open to sophomores or juniors with the permission of department chairperson.

PHYS 320 — Advanced Laboratory in Physics (2)
Experiments in classical and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 231 or permission of instructor. 6 laboratory hours per week.

PHYS 330 — Classical Mechanics (3)
A study of the principles of Newtonian, Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian mechanics of particles with applications to vibrations, rotations, orbital motion, and collisions. Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: MATH 238 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 340 — Optics (4)
A study of geometrical and physical optics: theory of lens systems, aberrations, apertures, interference, diffraction, polarization. Prerequisite: MATH 237 and PHYS 112. 3 lecture-recitation hours and 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS 350 — Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3)
Classical thermodynamics, zeroth, first, second and third law of thermodynamics and their applications (law of mass action, heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps, etc.), kinetic gas theory, and introduction to statistical mechanics. Prerequisites: MATH 231 and PHYS 231 or permission of instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 371 — Electricity and Magnetism I (3)
A study of electrostatics, electrical and magnetic properties of matter, Maxwell's equations, boundary-value problems, wave propagation and the steady-state magnetic field. Prerequisite: MATH 238 and PHYS 231 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 372 — Electricity and Magnetism II (3)
A study of electromagnetic wave propagation in media, wave guides, dipole radiation, electrodynamics of charged particles, special theory of relativity, and special topics. Prerequisite: PHYS 371. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 390 — Special Topics (3)
A junior level forum for a variety of current topics in physics. Students will be expected to supplement the traditional classroom work with additional research material in order to become familiar with the selected topic. The topics can be chosen to augment several major programs depending upon demand. Permission of the department chairperson is required.

PHYS 410 — Solid State Physics (3)
A study of crystal structure, wave propagation, mechanical, thermal and electromagnetic properties, free electron theory, band theory and Brillouin Zones, imperfections in solids and applications (e.g., semiconductors, transistors, superconductivity). Prerequisite: PHYS 231 or permission of instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 440 — Quantum Mechanics (3)
A study of black body radiation, wave and particle phenomena, dynamical operators, the Schrodinger equation and its applications, the Heisenberg formulation, the hydrogen atom, perturbation theory and its applications. Prerequisites: PHYS 231 and MATH 238 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 450 — Atomic and Nuclear Physics (3)
A study of atomic spectra, electronic structure of atoms, X-rays, scattering, nuclear models, and elementary particles. Prerequisites: PHYS 231, 440, and MATH 238 or permission of instructor. 3 lecture-recitation hours.

PHYS 485 — Cosmology and Advanced Astrophysics (3)
Big Bang cosmology, Robertson-Walker metric, Einstein equations, thermodynamics of the expanding universe, nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background, dark matter, formation of large-scale structure, evolution of galaxies, and dynamics of clusters of galaxies and large-scale structures. Prerequisites: MATH 238, PHYS 231 and PHYS 285. 3 lecture-recitation hours

PHYS 490 — Senior Seminar (2)
The reading and synthesis of current research in the physical literature. The student must prepare a seminar to be presented orally to the department faculty and students. The student is expected to answer questions based on material learned in completed courses but pertinent to the seminar topic. All students must attend seminars given by other students and visiting speakers.

PHYS 496, 497 — Physics Research III, IV (0-3)
Advanced projects in a specialization area of physics under the supervision of a Chemistry or Physics faculty member. Senior status required; open to juniors with the permission of department chairperson.

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