King's College - Biology

Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

BIOL 113 — Evolution and Diversity (4)

This course will start with the basics of Mendelian inheritance. A brief introduction to inheritance, sexual lifecycles, mitosis and meiosis, will lay the foundation for students to fully understand evolution of populations through natural selection and adaptation, the origin of species, and the history of life on Earth. Evolution will continue as a major theme throughout coverage of the diversity of life, focusing on shared and derived traits within taxa and highlighting relationships between form and function. 3 lecture, 1 problem and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 210 — Organisms and Their Ecosystems (4)

The correlation between form and function will be emphasized at the organismal through ecosystem levels of biological organization. The purpose of this course is two-fold: (1) to study the biophysical relationship between organisms within their ecosystem and (2) to study the biochemical relationship between systems within a given organism. Balance and homeostasis between organisms within an ecosystem share similarities with balance and homeostasis between organ systems within a particular organism. This course will be equally divided into three units: Ecology, Plant Form and Function, and Animal Form and Function. Prerequisite: BIOL 113. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 

BIOL 213 — Cell and Molecular Biology (4)

This course will provide students with a foundation in cellular and molecular biology.  Topics will include chemical principles, metabolism, cell architecture, patterns of inheritance, cellular reproduction, molecular genetics, and a reintroduction to evolution, particularly how it relates to and is supported by the central dogma of molecular biology.  While the scope of this course is broad, it will have a concentrated focus on metabolic and genetic principles. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 210. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 219 — Anatomy and Physiology I (4)

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence dealing with the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis. Topics include cytology, histology, and integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.  Prerequisites:  CHEM 107 or CHEM 113. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.   Intended primarily for Athletic Training Education Majors.

BIOL 220 — Anatomy and Physiology II (4)

A continuation of BIOL 219 involving the study of structure and function of the human body, this course deals with the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive and urogenital systems. Special emphasis is given to the concepts of metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, and development and heredity. Prerequisite:  Biol 219.  3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. Intended primarily for Athletic Training Education Majors.

BIOL 221 — Anatomy and Physiology I for Medical Studies (4)

A study of human anatomy and the relationship between structure and function. The course provides preparation in systemic physiology with concentration on major body functions and their controls. Topics include cytology, mitosis, meiosis, heredity, histology, organology and the following systems:  integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous.  Emphasis is given to case study problems with clinical applications relevant to students pursuing careers in the medical field.   Prerequisites:  BIOL 213 and CHEM 241.  3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. Intended primarily for Physician Assistant Majors.

BIOL 222 — Anatomy and Physiology II for Medical Studies (4)

A continuation of BIOL 221. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Emphasis is given to case study problems with clinical applications relevant to students pursuing careers in the medical field. Prerequisite: BIOL 221. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. Intended primarily for Physician Assistant Majors.

BIOL 224 Biochemistry for Medical Studies (3 or 4)

Biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleotides and nucleic acids; mechanism of enzyme action and regulation of enzymatic pathways; intermediary metabolism; lipid and nitrogen metabolism; physiochemistry of hemoglobin, the vitamins and selected hormones. Laboratory will consist of in depth discussions of modern techniques and clinical diseases in biochemistry. Prerequisites: BIOL 213, CHEM 241, or permission of instructor. 3 lecture hours. 3 lab hours for Clinical Laboratory Science majors. Intended primarily for Physician Assistant and Clinical Laboratory Science majors.

BIOL 229 — Modern Techniques in Biological Sciences (1)

A hands-on course to introduce students to techniques used in biological research. The student will work in the research laboratory of a designated faculty member to provide experience using modern equipment in the context of an ongoing faculty research project. Emphasis will be placed on developing laboratory or field skills to prepare the student for writing a research proposal in BIOL 370 and conducting independent research in BIOL 490. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 270 — Sophomore Seminar (1)

The Sophomore Seminar will build on the foundation established in Biol 113, 210 and 213 with a focus on accessing and reading primary literature for knowledge, application, and analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL 113, 210, and 213.

BIOL 310 — Computer Modeling in Biology and Environmental Science (3)

The student will learn the basics of how to use a visual-modeling environment, Stella 1I, and Starlogo, to simulate various phenomena in Biology, ecology, and environmental science. Computer assignments and models will be tailored to students in their individual major. No computer programming experience is needed and the course is open to any student in the sciences. Cross-listed as ENST 310. Primarily offered online during a summer session.

BIOL 314 —Microbiology (3 or 4)

A study of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae, fungi, and other microbial forms. The morphology, physiology, ecology, evolution of these organisms, their pathogenesis, host responses, epidemiology, and control are discussed. Laboratory exercises illustrate morphology, growth, biochemical characteristics, identification and classification, microbial immunity, genetics and various laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 241 or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 323 — Genetics (3 or 4)             

An introduction to heredity. A balanced presentation is made in the fields of classical, molecular, and population genetics. Topics include: Mendelian inheritance, Molecular Genetics, Population Genetics, Quantitative Genetics, Phylogenetics, and Evolution. Laboratory investigations span a variety of organisms and techniques used in modern Genetics applications.  Prerequisites: BIOL 213 and CHEM 114, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 324 — Biochemistry (3 or 4)

Biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleotides and nucleic acids; mechanism of enzyme action and regulation of enzymatic pathways; intermediary metabolism; lipid and nitrogen metabolism; physiochemistry of hemoglobin, the vitamins and selected hormones. Laboratory exercises consist of modern techniques and instrumentation of biochemistry: spectrophotometry; electrophoresis; column chromatography; enzymatic determinations; protein isolation and characterization. Prerequisites: CHEM  242, or permission of instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 326 — Immunology (3 or 4)

Fundamentals of immunology, immunopathology, immunochemistry, and serology. Topics include: the immune system; structure, function, and formation of immunoglobulins; cellular and genetic basis of immune response; antigen-antibody reactions; the complement system; immunochemistry; hypersensitivity; transplantation; and methods in immunology. Laboratory exercises consist of methods to measure antibodies and the use of antibodies to detect other substances. Prerequisites: BIOL 210 and 213. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 327 — Immunology and Clinical Microbiology (4)

Prerequisites: BIOL 210 and 213. 3 lecture hours and 3 lab hours. Intended primarily for Physician Assistant.

BIOL 330 — Introductory Bioinformatics (3)

Modern manipulation of molecular genetic data in the field of bioinformatics. Topics include genomics, proteomics, and systematics. A discussion of data collection techniques is followed by demonstration of data manipulation and analysis. A semester-long project based on human genetic diseases allows for the development and implementation of pertinent techniques in the field via computer analysis of international genetic databases. Prerequisite: BIOL 213 (BIOL 323 recommended), or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture hours.

BIOL 336 — Cell Biology (3 or 4)

Application of genetic and biochemical concepts to the rigorous analysis of the structure and function of cells. Special attention is devoted to the interactions between cells and between cells and the non-cellular environment, signaling and response mechanisms, and regulation of gene activity. Specific examples for illustration will be drawn from developmental contexts and disease states. The laboratory will use cell culture as a means of providing model systems to afford students experience with techniques used to elucidate cellular integration and regulation mechanisms. Prerequisites: BIOL 213 (BIOL 324 recommended), CHEM 242, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 341 — Topics in Biochemistry/Physiology/Genetics (3)

Provides rigorous coverage of key areas of biochemistry, physiology, and genetics, which are prerequisite to the understanding of physiological control mechanisms fundamental to modern medical practice. Integration of information and its application to clinical situations is emphasized. The role of genetics in the etiology of various pathological states is also emphasized. Recent advances in molecular biology and reproductive technology and the associated moral, ethical, and legal dilemmas discussed as they relate to patient education and referral situations. Intended primarily for Physician Assistant Majors. 3 lecture hours.

BIOL 349 — Animal Behavior (3 or 4)

The study of behavior has become complex, requiring knowledge in more than one discipline. In this class, students will learn about animal behavior from a physiological, developmental, functional, and evolutionary perspective. Areas of concentration will include behavioral genetics, communication, behavioral endocrinology, altruism, neurobiology, social behavior, sexual behavior, parental care, and human behavior. Lab activities will include both laboratory study and field work. Cross-listed as NEUR 349. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 350 — Vertebrate Embryology (3 or 4)

A comparative study of vertebrate development considering gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, formation of germ layers and an analysis of the differentiation of tissues, organs, and systems of representative vertebrates. Prerequisites: BIOL 210, 213, CHEM 242, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 355 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4)

Emphasis is placed on the comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrate animals. Comparison is made in terms of systematic structural and functional units, patterns of development, adaptation, and phylogenetic relationships among representative species of extant and extinct vertebrates. The evolutionary origin of the chordates and their invertebrate ancestors is traced. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 210, CHEM 242, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 370 — Junior Seminar (2)

The Biology Junior Seminar guides students through the process of writing a research proposal. Assignments focus on helping students strengthen their abilities to transfer information literacy, critical thinking, and effective communication skills developed through the core curriculum and major program to a specific project in the major. The Junior Seminar also helps students develop a clearer understanding of the expectations of faculty in the major with respect to their ability to apply critical thinking skills and to communicate effectively. Students have the opportunity to complete the proposed research in BIOL 490. Prerequisite: BIOL 270. 2 lecture/seminar hours. 

BIOL 380 — Neuroendocrinology (3)

This course will use the stress response to study the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the neuroendocrine system.  This course will cover topics such as endocrine signaling, homeostasis versus allostasis, the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system, hormones regulating basic biological functions, neuronal control of endocrine function, acute versus chronic stress, and diseases resulting from chronic stress. Prerequisites:  BIOL 210 and 213. 3 lecture hours.

BIOL 401A-N — Special Topics in Environmental Science (3 or 4)

Selected topics in environmental sciences.  Formats of courses vary substantially and may include: primarily lecture, significant lab and/or field component, immersion at remote sites, or primarily online instruction. Topics include Conservation Biology (3), Wildlife Natural History (4), Wildlife Ecology and Management (3), Ecotoxicology (4), Wildlife Techniques (4), Water Quality Analysis, Tropical Ecology (3), Chesapeake Bay Ecology (4), Adirondack Park Ecology (4), Wetland Ecology & Delineation (3), Environmental Health (3), Tropical Ecosystems: Peru (3), and Agroecology (4). Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 210, or permission of the instructor. 3 or 4 lecture/lab hours. Cross-listed as ENST 401; see the Environmental Studies/Science section of the catalog for individual course descriptions.

BIOL 416 — Parasitology (3 or 4)

A parasite is any organism that uses another organism to its benefit.  Organisms in every Kingdom have evolved to use this strategy. The most lethal human diseases in the world are caused by parasitic organisms. The lecture portion of this course will address the basic biology, life cycles, and epidemiology of parasites. The laboratory portion of the exercise will demonstrate how to identify parasitic infections in different stages of their life cycles as well as two multi-week modules on the roles of genotype and environment on parasitism.  Prerequisites: BIOL 113, 210 and 213, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 420 – Botany (3 or 4)

An overview of the field of vascular plant biology, this course focuses on diversity, form and function, ecology and human uses of plants. Topics include reproduction, growth and development, resource acquisition and translocation, evolutionary relationships, identification, symbioses, and herbivory. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 210, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 430 — Ecology (3 or 4)

The study of the interrelationships and interactions of organisms and their environments. Topics include population dynamics, interspecific relationships, community structure and function, nutrient cycling, and energy flow in ecosystems and biome diversity. Laboratory topics include field trips and study of local natural areas, and introduction to ecological research methods and biostatistics. Prerequisite: BIOL 113 and 210, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 optional laboratory hours.

BIOL 447 — Physiology (3 or 4)

The study of the functions and interactions of organ systems. Topics include respiration, circulation, muscle contraction, digestion, homeostasis and removal of waste material. Includes one hour per week discussion on the effects of venoms on human physiology. Laboratory investigations utilize computer data acquisition to study the major lecture topics using frogs, mice, and humans as test subjects. BIOL 210 and 213, CHEM 242, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 450 — Molecular Genetics: DNA Science (3 or 4)

Genetic structure and regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms; recombinant DNA technology; mutation/suppression; transcription/translation; and DNA polymorphisms. Laboratory exercises include: RE digest and analysis, directional cloning using PCR, genomic DNA and plasmid isolation, site-directed mutagenesis, gene fusions, DNA sequencing, DNA fingerprinting. Prerequisites: BIOL 213 (BIOL 323 recommended) and CHEM 242, or permission of the instructor. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

Biol453 — Systems Biology (4)

Systems Biology attempts to correlate the growing databases of genomic and proteomic information within the context of the function of cells as a whole. Techniques used include a combination of molecular biology and biochemistry wet labs followed by computer analysis and modeling of the results. A metabolic pathway will be studied in detail to discover changes in both genetic and protein regulation in response to changing conditions. Prerequisites:  BIOL 213 (BIOL 324 recommended), and CHEM 242. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 456 – Molecular Neuroscience (4)

This course focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases.  Topics covered in this course include: neuronal signaling, mechanisms of cell survival, differentiation and proliferation, mechanisms of neuronal injury, current in vitro models of neurodegenerative diseases, and treatment strategies for these diseases.   Techniques learned in this course will include tissue culture of primary neurons and neuronal cell lines, developing in vitro models of disease, cell death and protection assays, molecular techniques in protein biology, and microscopy. Prerequisites:  BIOL 210 and 213.  NEUR 211 recommended. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

BIOL 470 — Senior Seminar (1)

This course will serve as the capstone for Biology majors. The course includes three main elements. Students will read and discuss primary literature with a focus on evaluation and critique to demonstrate critical thinking and understanding of the scientific method. Students will also present a research poster, based on a project completed in a Research Intensive Course, to demonstrate oral communication skills. Finally, students will complete a Biology Major Field test to demonstrate breadth and depth of understanding in the biological sciences. Prerequisite: BIOL 370 and a Research Intensive Course. 

BIOL 490 — Biological Research I (4)

This independent research course is designed for students to implement the research project developed in the Junior Seminar (370). The student works in the research laboratory of a faculty member conducting original and independent scientific research. The culmination of the course is a written and poster presentation of a scientific report. Prerequisite: BIOL 370.

BIOL 491 — Biological Research II (2, 3 or 4)

For students who want to continue original, independent research. Prerequisite: BIOL 490. Variable credit; time and credit established by contract between instructor and student.

BIOL 499 — Biology Internship

A Biology internship may be taken during the junior or senior year. The Department Chairperson should be consulted. A minimum G.P.A. of 2.50 is required.

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