King's College - Chemistry

Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

CHEM 107 — General, Organic, and Biochemistry (4)

Chemistry 107 and the associated laboratory Chemistry 107L are intended for those enter­ing health science and related ?elds such as Athletic Training and Physical Therapy. The course will progress from the basic tenets of general chemistry through organic chemistry and ?nally to biochemistry. Medical and health-related applications will be emphasized. 4 lecture and 3 laboratory hours per week.

CHEM 113, 114 — General Chemistry I, II (4, 4)

Fundamental concepts and principles common to the various branches of chemistry. This includes descriptive chemistry, which deals in a systematic way with the more important elements and the structures, properties and reactions of their compounds. A balance be­tween experiment and theory, between quantitative and qualitative aspects of the course material, and between rigor and simpli?cation is sought. Laboratory work emphasizes learning basic techniques, learning to manipulate and interpret numerical data, and learn­ing the relationship between experimental measurement and chemical theory through guided, independent work by the student. Primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences. Prerequisite: High school chemistry. 4 lecture-recitation and 3 laboratory hours for two semesters.

CHEM 197 — Early Research Experience in Chemistry (0-1)

An introduction to chemical research under the supervision of a department faculty member. A written report is required. Freshmen chemistry majors may begin chemical research if they earn at least a B+ in CHEM 113 and B in CHEM 113L. Permission of the faculty member and the Department Chairperson is required.

CHEM 241, 242 — Organic Chemistry I, II (4, 4)

A study of elemental carbon and the properties, structures, reactions, and syntheses of carbon compounds. Nomenclature, structure determination by spectrometric methods, reaction mechanisms, and the relationship between structure and reactivity are among the topics covered along with the application of principles to the descriptive aspects of the subject. Laboratory work involves the synthesis of organic compounds, physical property measurements, separation and puri?cation techniques, and the use of spectroscopic meth­ods for compound identi?cation. Prerequisite: CHEM 114. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours for two semesters.

CHEM 243 — Analytical Chemistry (5)

An application of the principles of equilibrium, electrochemistry and spectrophotometry to quantitative chemical analysis. The laboratory utilizes gravimetric, volumetric, poten­tiometric, and spectrophotometric methods of analysis with an emphasis on the technique required to produce accurate and precise results. Prerequisite: CHEM 114. 3 lecture and 4 laboratory hours.

CHEM 244 — Instrumental Analysis (5)

The theory and practice of quantitative and qualitative chemical analysis using instrumen­tal techniques. Topics include the theory of operation, data interpretation, and practical applications of important spectroscopic, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 243 and approval of the Department Chairperson is required. 3 lecture and 4 laboratory hours.

CHEM 252 — Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences (4)

An introduction to the basic principles, theories, techniques, and methods of physical chemistry and their application to materials and processes occurring in living systems, but without the usual mathematical precision and rigor. Laboratory work emphasizes the quantitative acquisition of experimental data by classical and instrumental methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 114, PHYS 112, MATH 125, and permission of the Department Chairperson. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM 296, 297 — Chemical Research I, II (0-2, 0-2)

Research into a problem of current chemical interest under the supervision of a depart­ment member. A written report is required. Sophomore chemistry majors may participate if they have a 3.400 G.P.A. in their chemistry courses and an overall G.P.A. of 3.000. Permission of the faculty member and the Department Chair is required.

CHEM 351 — Chemical Information Science (1)

An introduction to the methods of chemical information retrieval and display. While hand searching of library materials is covered, CD-ROM and on-line computer searching will be emphasized. Sources of chemical information on the Internet will be explored. Stu­dents will become familiar with both 2-D and 3-D molecular drawing and visualization software, and the interface of these programs with presentation and Internet packages. 1 lecture and 1 library/computer practicum per week.

CHEM 353 — Biochemistry (4) (or BIOL 224/L (4))

An introduction to the major classes of biomolecules, enzymology, metabolism, and bioenergetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 242. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM 357, 358 — Physical Chemistry I, II (10)

A study of the macroscopic properties and principles of matter and energy that will be developed with appropriate rigor. Selected topics include the four laws of thermodynam­ics, phase and reaction equilibria, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical thermodynamics. Laboratories will closely correlate with topics discussed in lecture and will emphasize the completion of properly formatted and scienti?cally written laboratory reports. Prerequisites: CHEM 114, PHYS 112; concurrent: MATH 237. 3 lecture and 4 laboratory hours for 2 semesters.

CHEM 359 — Organic Structure Determination (3)

The application of the principles of organic chemistry to the separation and identi?cation of organic compounds. Classical and spectrometric methods will be utilized to determine properties and structure of these compounds, which will aid in their identi?cation. Pre­requisite: CHEM 242. 2 hours lecture-recitation and 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM 373 — Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)

Selected topics in organic, medicinal, or biochemistry. The choice of topics will be made by the instructor, depending on the mutual interests of the instructor and the students. Pre­requisites: CHEM 242 and permission of the Department Chairperson. 3 lecture hours.

CHEM 396, 397 — Chemical Research I, II (0-2, 0-2)

Research into a problem of current Chemical interest under the supervision of a depart­ment member. A written report is required. Junior chemistry majors or minors may participate if they have a 3.400 G.P.A. in their chemistry courses and an overall G.P.A. of 3.000. Permission of the faculty member and the Department Chairperson is required.

CHEM 471 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (5)

The properties and reactivities of inorganic compounds will be explained in terms of molecular symmetry, group theory, and molecular orbital theory. Sections on coordina­tion and organometallic compounds will highlight synthesis, reactivity trends, and recent advances. In the second half of the course there will be an emphasis on the preparation, characterization, and properties of solid state inorganic compounds. Laboratory work will involve the synthesis, puri?cation, and characterization of inorganic compounds. Inert at­mosphere, high temperature, high pressure, and glassblowing techniques will be acquired. The laboratory will place emphasis on the synthesis and properties of inorganic solid state materials. The laboratory is required for American Chemical Society Certi?cation, but not for graduation with a Chemistry major. 3 lecture hours and 4 laboratory hours.

CHEM 475 — Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)

Selected topics in analytical chemistry. The choice of topics will be made in accord with the mutual interests of the instructor and students. Possible categories include forensic chem­istry, spectroscopy, electrochemistry and other analytical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 244 or CHEM 252 and permission of the Department Chairperson. 3 lecture hours.

CHEM 476 — Chemistry of Materials (3)

This course focuses on the relationship of structure to physical properties, with an em­phasis on materials with every day or industrial relevance. Methods of materials prepa­ration along with the principles behind rational design of materials will be discussed. The analytical methods used to study materials will be surveyed. Among the classes of materials examined are crystalline inorganic solids, organic polymers, glasses, catalysts, and composites. Pre- or co-requisites: CHEM 357 and permission of the Department Chairperson. 3 lecture hours.

CHEM 477 — Advanced Physical Chemistry (3)

Selected topics in physical Chemistry. Building on the basic concepts of physical chemistry discussed in CHEM 357-358, Advanced Physical Chemistry will focus on 1) a postula­tional development of thermodynamics 2) an in-depth discussion of phase transforma­tions, speci?cally the differences between ?rst and second order phase transitions and solid-solid or liquid-liquid phase transformations 3) a rigorous treatment of the structure of solid state materials, beginning with the development of Bravais lattices and ending with the characterization of solid materials via x-ray diffraction 4) an advanced look at spectroscopic methods: infrared and Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), laser techniques, and photochemical methods (?uorescence and phospho­rescence). Prerequisites: CHEM 357, MATH 238, PHYS 112, and permission of the Department Chairperson. 3 lecture hours.

CHEM 479 — Solid State Chemistry (3)

This course surveys the wide variety of inorganic solid state structures and their properties. Topics include solid-state structure, crystal symmetry, electronic structure from a band theory perspective, magnetism, defects and their effects on properties, phase diagrams, Chemical and physical properties of solids, x-ray diffraction, other analytical methods, synthetic methods, and important uses of solid state materials. Pre- or co-requisites: CHEM 357 and permission of Department Chairperson. 3 lecture hours.

CHEM 493, 494 — Senior Colloquium (1, 1)

The reading and synthesis of current research in the chemical literature. The student must prepare two seminars, one each semester, in two different areas of chemistry. These semi­nars are presented orally to the department faculty and students. The student is expected to answer questions based on material learned in completed courses but pertinent to the seminar topic. All senior Chemistry majors must attend seminars given by other students and visiting speakers. Pass/Fail.

CHEM 496, 497 — Senior Research I, II (0 or 3, 0 or 3)

An experimental or theoretical research project undertaken by the student under the supervision of a department member. The research requires the student to use advanced concepts and techniques to develop new knowledge that might be publishable. The inter­relationship between laboratory work and literature searching is emphasized. A detailed written report describing the work must be submitted to the Department Chairperson upon completion of the course. A combined total of 10 laboratory and library hours is required. Only open to senior science majors. Permission of the faculty member and the De­partment Chairperson is required.

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