Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

ENGR 150 - Engineering Seminar (2)

An introduction to the various engineering disciplines and careers designed specifically for students in the 3+2 Engineering Program. The course will be project-centered and will require students to collaboratively solve problems, design systems, and manage projects.

2 recitation hours

ENGR 250 - Introduction to Engineering Systems and Design (4)

An introduction to engineering management designed specifically for students in the 3+2 Engineering Program. The course will utilize project-based learning to introduce students to component, subassembly, and product design; project management; product management; engineering economics; cost accounting and technical writing

Prerequisite: ENGR 150 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture hours and 3 project hours

 

CHEM 113, 114 — General Chemistry I, II (4, 4)

Fundamental concepts and principles common to the various branches of chemistry. This includes descriptive chemistry, which deals in a systematic way with the more important elements and the structures, properties and reactions of their compounds. A balance be­tween experiment and theory, between quantitative and qualitative aspects of the course material, and between rigor and simpli?cation is sought. Laboratory work emphasizes learning basic techniques, learning to manipulate and interpret numerical data, and learn­ing the relationship between experimental measurement and chemical theory through guided, independent work by the student. Primarily for students majoring in the natural sciences. Prerequisite: High school chemistry. 4 lecture-recitation and 3 laboratory hours for two semesters.

 

CHEM 241, 242 — Organic Chemistry I, II (4, 4)

A study of elemental carbon and the properties, structures, reactions, and syntheses of carbon compounds. Nomenclature, structure determination by spectrometric methods, reaction mechanisms, and the relationship between structure and reactivity are among the topics covered along with the application of principles to the descriptive aspects of the subject. Laboratory work involves the synthesis of organic compounds, physical property measurements, separation and puri?cation techniques, and the use of spectroscopic meth­ods for compound identi?cation. Prerequisite: CHEM 114. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours for two semesters.

 

CHEM 243 — Analytical Chemistry (5)

An application of the principles of equilibrium, electrochemistry and spectrophotometry to quantitative chemical analysis. The laboratory utilizes gravimetric, volumetric, poten­tiometric, and spectrophotometric methods of analysis with an emphasis on the technique required to produce accurate and precise results. Prerequisite: CHEM 114. 3 lecture and 4 laboratory hours.

 

CHEM 244 — Instrumental Analysis (5)

The theory and practice of quantitative and qualitative chemical analysis using instrumen­tal techniques. Topics include the theory of operation, data interpretation, and practical applications of important spectroscopic, chromatographic and electrochemical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 243 and approval of the Department Chairperson is required. 3 lecture and 4 laboratory hours.

 

CHEM 357, 358 — Physical Chemistry I, II (10)

A study of the macroscopic properties and principles of matter and energy that will be developed with appropriate rigor. Selected topics include the four laws of thermodynam­ics, phase and reaction equilibria, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical thermodynamics. Laboratories will closely correlate with topics discussed in lecture and will emphasize the completion of properly formatted and scienti?cally written laboratory reports. Prerequisites: CHEM 114, PHYS 112; concurrent: MATH 237. 3 lecture and 4 laboratory hours for 2 semesters.

 

CS 116 — Fundamentals of Programming I (3)

This course begins a two-class sequence that introduces students to problem solving and program design. Topics include types and expressions, control structures, libraries, func­tions, parameter passing and array processing. Offered fall semesters. Cross-listed as CIS 116.

 

CS 117 — Fundamentals of Programming II (3)

This course is the second of a two-class sequence that introduces students to problem solving and program design. It begins where CS 116 left off and covers more advanced topics of programming including problem solving and fundamental algorithms for vari­ous applications in science and business. Offered spring semesters. Cross-listed as CIS 117. Prerequisites: CS 116 or CIS 116.

 

CS 232 — Data Structures (3)

This course is an introduction to the implementation of data structures including lists, stacks, queues and trees. Additionally, this class will cover advanced programming tech­niques such as recursion, efficient sorting and searching algorithms, fi le I/O, and storage management. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: CS 117 or CIS 117, or consent of the instructor.

 

MATH 127 — Logic and Axiomatics (3)

Topics include logic; inductive and deductive reasoning; direct and indirect proofs; proof by counter-example: set theory: axiom systems; consistency and independence of axiom systems; axiom system design. Prerequisite: CORE 098 Mathematical skills. Offered fall semesters.

 

MATH 129 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (4)

The fi rst calculus course in a three-course sequence. Intended primarily for chemistry, computer science, or mathematics majors. Topics include equations; inequalities; analytic geometry; trigonometric functions; an introduction to exponential and logarithmic functions; limits; continuity; derivatives; differentials; maxima and minima problems; graphing techniques; the defi nite integral. Prerequisite: CORE 098 — Mathematical skills. Offered fall semesters.

MATH 130 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (4)

 Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions; applications of the defi nite integral; techniques of integration; improper integrals; indeterminate forms; sequences; series. Prerequisite: MATH 129 or the approval of the department chairperson. Offered spring semesters.

 

MATH 231 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus III (4)

Topics include polar coordinates; parametric equations; conics; solid analytic geometry; vectors; partial differentiation; multiple integration; vector fi elds; line integrals; and Green's Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 130 or the approval of the department chairperson. Offered fall semesters.

 

MATH 235 — Discrete Mathematics (3)

A survey of some of the fundamental ideas of discrete mathematics. Topics include set theory, relations on sets (especially equivalence relations, partial orders, and functions), number theory, induction and recursion, combinatorics, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 127 and MATH 130 or approval of the Department Chairperson. Offered fall semesters.

 

MATH 237 — Applied Linear Algebra (3)

Topics include calculus beyond MATH 125, an introduction to linear algebra, including: systems of linear equations, matrices, and determinants; differential equations; and use of multivariable functions. The emphasis is on the applications to physical systems. Prerequisite: MATH 125 or the approval of the department chairperson. Offered fall semester.

 

MATH 238 — Differential Equations (3)

Topics include calculus beyond MATH 125, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, systems of differential equations, the Laplace transform, and the Fourier transform. The emphasis is on the applications to physical systems. Prerequisite: MATH 237. Offered spring semesters.

 

MATH 250 — Linear Algebra (4)

Topics include vector spaces; linear transformations; matrices; systems of linear equations; determinants; eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Computers are used both computationally and graphically. Prerequisite: MATH 127 and MATH 231 or permission of department chairperson. Offered spring semesters.

 

MATH 361 — Probability (3)

Topics include set functions, counting methods, events, independence, conditional probability, Bayes rule, univariate probability distributions; including binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, uniform, exponential, gamma, and normal; multivariate probability distributions; including the bivariate normal; joint probability functions, joint probability density functions, conditional and marginal probability distributions; transformations, and order statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 231 or approval of the Department Chairperson. Offered fall semesters.

 

PHYS 111 — General Physics I (4)

The first semester of a two-semester sequence focusing on mechanics. The course provides a calculus-based introduction to the laws of motion of Galileo and Newton, the fundamentals of energy conservation, oscillatory motion, gravitation and orbital motion.  Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 125 or MATH 129 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture hours, 1 problem hour and 3 laboratory hours.

 

PHYS 112 — General Physics II (4)

The second semester of a two-semester sequence focusing on waves, light and electromagnetism. The course provides a calculus-based introduction to the properties of waves, geometric and wave optics, electric fields, basic electric circuits, and magnetism.

Prerequisite: PHYS 111 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture hours, 1 problem hour, and 3 laboratory hours.

 

PHYS 231 — Modern Physics (4)

An introduction to modern physics. Topics include special relativity, quantum physics, waves and particles, and atomic and nuclear physics.

Prerequisites: MATH 130 and PHYS 112 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture-recitation hours and 3 laboratory hours.

 

PHYS 233 — Electronics I (4)

Introduction to basic electronic circuits and devices, with a major emphasis on solid state circuitry. Topics include AC-DC circuits and electrical measuring devices, power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators, operational amplifiers and switching and timing devices.

Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or permission of instructor.

Co-requisite: MATH 238 or permission of instructor

3 lecture-recitation hours and 3 laboratory hours.

 

PHYS 234 — Electronics II (4)

Introduction to the analysis and synthesis of electronic circuits for signal processing, using passive elements as well as modern active devices including solid-state diodes and transistors.  The design of both digital and analog circuitry will be discussed, and the applications and limitations of these circuits and devices will be addressed. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 233 or permission of instructor.

3 lecture-recitation hours and 3 laboratory hours.

 

PHYS 241 — Statics (3)

A study of the basic principles of mechanics applicable to rigid bodies in equilibrium, the kinematics and kinetics of particle motion and an application of these principles to the solution of a variety of practical and more complicated problems.

Prerequisite: MATH 130 and PHYS 112 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture-recitation hours.

 

PHYS 242 — Mechanics of Solids (3)

An introduction to the concepts of stress and strain, material properties, deflections of bars under axial, torsional and bending loads, statically indeterminate problems, and stress transformations.

Prerequisite: MATH 130 and PHYS 241 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture-recitation hours.

 

PHYS 330 — Classical Mechanics (3)

A study of the principles of Newtonian, Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian mechanics of particles with applications to vibrations, rotations, orbital motion, and collisions.

Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or permission of the instructor.

Co-requisite: MATH 238 or permission of the instructor

3 lecture-recitation hours.

 

PHYS 350 — Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3)

Classical thermodynamics, zeroth, first, second and third law of thermodynamics and their applications (law of mass action, heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps, etc.), kinetic gas theory, and introduction to statistical mechanics.

Prerequisites: MATH 231 and PHYS 231 or permission of instructor.

3 lecture-recitation hours.

 

PHYS 371 — Electricity and Magnetism I (3)

A study of electrostatics, electrical and magnetic properties of matter, Maxwell's equations, boundary-value problems, wave propagation and the steady-state magnetic field.

Prerequisite: MATH 238 and PHYS 231 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture-recitation hours

 

PHYS 440 — Quantum Mechanics (3)

A study of black body radiation, wave and particle phenomena, dynamical operators, the Schrodinger equation and its applications, the Heisenberg formulation, the hydrogen atom, perturbation theory and its applications.

Prerequisites: PHYS 231 and MATH 238 or permission of the instructor.

3 lecture-recitation hours.

 

PHYS 490 — Senior Seminar (2)

The reading and synthesis of current research in the physical literature. The student must prepare a seminar to be presented orally to the department faculty and students. The student is expected to answer questions based on material learned in completed courses but pertinent to the seminar topic. All students must attend seminars given by other students and visiting speakers. Permission of the department chairperson is required.

 

ENST 201 — Environmental Science I (4)

This is the first in a series of two introductory environmental courses that introduces students to the concepts and principles of environmental science. Through a combina­tion of field and laboratory experiences, students will be introduced to methods for assessing and monitoring the environmental health of ecosystems. Topics for discussion include weather and climate, biodiversity, ecosystem management, energy transfer and balance, population growth, bioremediation, and environmental toxicology. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours; lecture portion cross-listed as Core 270E.

 

ENST 202 — Environmental Science II (4)

This is the second in the series of introductory environmental courses with a focus on natural resource use. Topics will include energy, global warming, water resources, toxic wastes, ozone depletion, and renewable and non-renewable resources. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours; lecture portion cross-listed as Core 274.

 

ENST 401F — Water Quality Analysis (3)

A lab course that introduces students to the biological and chemical analysis of fresh water.span>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© King's College • 133 North River Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 • 1-888-KINGS-PA Contact Us | Site Index