AT 101 — Introduction to Athletic Training (3)

Entry-level course designed to introduce the profession and the historical foundations of Athletic Training. The course will delineate the responsibilities of the Athletic Training Team, injury prevention techniques, conditioning techniques, mechanisms of sports trauma, bloodborne pathogens, foundations of sports trauma, and basic management skills. The student will be presented with basic practical skills and knowledge applied to an Athletic Training setting. The role of the Athletic Trainer and career opportunities will be discussed.

AT 165 — Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries (3)

The student will be introduced to emergency and immediate care of athletic injuries. Medical emergencies, physical trauma, various disease pathologies, bleeding, respiratory and cardiac emergencies, and transportation of the injured will be explored. The student will also experience emergency bandaging for open wounds, splinting for fractures and sprains, crutch fitting, and the use of a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer in a practical setting. Upon completion of Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries, the student will be certified in American Red Cross First Aid and CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers.

AT 202 — Athletic Training Clinical I (3)

The student will be exposed to locating and palpating anatomical landmarks and skeletal muscle origins and insertions on both the upper and lower quarters. In addition, psychomotor skills will be learned and applied involving various taping, wrapping, padding, bandaging, and wound care techniques for the lower quarter. These skills will be applied in athletic practices and games at the Betzler Athletic Training Facility and the Scandlon Sports Medicine Clinic on King’s College athletes and patients. Class lecture will be applied, and testing will follow an oral/practical format.

AT 203 — Athletic Training Clinical II (3)

The student will build upon the knowledge gained in Clinical I. Proper techniques of upper and lower quarter stretching and goniometry will be presented. The student will also be instructed in the principles of proper strength training and conditioning. In addition, various taping, wrapping, padding, bandaging, and wound care techniques for the upper quarter will be learned and applied. The student will continue to develop the taping and wrapping techniques learned in both Clinicals I and II. Class lecture will be applied, and the student will be tested using an oral/practical testing format. Prerequisite: AT 202.

AT 230 — Prevention & Care of Athletic Injuries I (3)

An introduction to the pathology and management of skin disorders, mechanisms of injury, signs and symptoms, and management procedures for common sport/activity related trauma to the lower quarter. Basic evaluative techniques, special testing techniques, and protective pad construction for the lower quarter will be presented.

AT 231 — Prevention & Care of Athletic Injuries II (3)

An introduction to mechanisms of injury, injury pathology, signs and symptoms, and management procedures for common sport/activity related trauma to the upper torso, extremities, spine, and head. Basic evaluative techniques, special testing techniques, protective pad construction, and taping/wrapping techniques for the upper quarter will be presented.

AT 245 — Principles of Health (3)

The student will be introduced to techniques and principles to improve an individual’s mental and physical health. Human sexuality and personal relations will be explored. The effects of legal and illegal drugs on the body will be examined. Systemic and acquired diseases and their effects on the human body will be investigated. The final areas of emphasis for this course will be to study the effects of aging, dying, and the various types of medical services available to the consumer.

AT 280 — Kinesiology (3)

The student will primarily be exposed to functional human anatomy focusing on skeletal muscle origin, insertion, action, and nerve supply. In addition, the student will develop an understanding and appreciation of fundamental principles that relate to human movement and, in particular, an understanding of those principles that apply to efficient, skilled, and safe movement. The student will develop the ability to functionally and mechanically analyze typical and irregular or potentially harmful movements in terms of principles derived primarily from anatomy, physiology, and biomechanical physics.

AT 290 — Exercise Physiology (3)

Presents the student with a comprehensive study of the human body’s responses to exercise. Topics include respiratory response to exercise, principles of training and conditioning and the resulting adaptations of the human body, cardiovascular training principles, energy production, metabolism, body composition, and muscular adaptations to exercise. The student will have the opportunity to apply these principles in a practical setting through laboratory activities.

AT 302 — Athletic Training Clinical III (4)

This course places the student in a situation where he/she will assist in the health care of patients during practices, games, and rehabilitation under the direct supervision of a Preceptor. Clinical settings include King’s College athletics, local high schools, and local colleges/universities. The student will learn and apply psychomotor skills involving various orthopedic special testing techniques, manual muscle testing techniques, and neurological and reflex testing for the lower quarter. Class lecture will be applied, and testing will follow an oral/practical format. Prerequisite: AT 203.

AT 303 — Athletic Training Clinical IV (4)

This course is a continuation of previous Clinicals. In addition to working with various athletic teams at a clinical site, the student will assist in providing care to injured patients through the administration of various therapeutic modalities and rehabilitation protocols under the direct supervision of a Preceptor. The student will learn and apply psychomotor skills involving various orthopedic special testing techniques, manual muscle testing techniques, and neurological and reflex testing for the upper quarter. Class lecture will be applied, and testing will follow an oral/practical format. Prerequisite: AT 302.

AT 305 — Evaluation and Diagnosis in Athletic Training I (3)

The student will learn evaluation techniques including manual muscle testing, soft tissue palpation, bone palpation, special joint integrity testing techniques for the lower quarter, and gait analysis. The student will be presented with practical situations in which critical thinking must be applied to the application of special testing techniques.

AT 306 — Evaluation and Diagnosis in Athletic Training II (3)

The student will learn evaluation techniques including manual muscle testing, soft tissue palpation, bone palpation, and special joint integrity testing techniques for the upper quarter. The student will be presented with practical situations in which critical thinking must be applied to the application of special testing techniques. Prerequisite: AT 305.

AT 310 — Therapeutic Modalities (3)

The student will be introduced to theory and techniques of therapeutic modalities. Critical thinking in the application and development of protocols will be taught and utilized.

AT 310-L — Therapeutic Modalities Lab (1)

The student will learn and implement psychomotor skills by applying various therapeutic modalities in a practical environment. Proper SOAP note documentation will be presented to properly record the use of therapeutic modalities in a clinical setting. Critical thinking will be applied by the student as to the frequency and protocol for each modality.

AT 311 — Therapeutic Exercise (3)

Explores the theory and application of various types of exercise. Topics include the consequence of sudden inactivity, injury immobilization, early intervention, types of exercise, and how therapeutic modalities can be coordinated with exercise. The student will develop rehabilitative protocols for various orthopedic injuries.

AT 311-L — Therapeutic Exercise Lab (1)

The student will learn psychomotor skills by applying various therapeutic exercises. The student will implement exercise protocols for various upper and lower quarter injuries. Techniques in therapeutic stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, joint mobilizations, functional exercise, plyometrics, gait training, and isokinetic equipment will be presented.

AT 325 — Nutrition and the Athlete (3)

The student will understand the relationship between physical fitness, physical performance, injury prevention, and nutritional intake. The student will develop an understanding of how to improve physical performance through proper utilization of food, how to identify improper eating habits, the effects of food supplements, techniques and effectiveness of carbohydrate loading, and the construction of a pre-event meal

AT 402 — Athletic Training Clinical V (4)

At this time, the student will become involved in the total health care of the patient under the direct supervision of a Preceptor. The student will implement all psychomotor skills and information that were presented during the previous three years. The clinical experience may take place at any affiliated clinical sites. In class lecture, the student will be exposed to the education and counseling of the injured patient as well as intervention with the drug and alcohol abusing patient. Prerequisite: Completion of all 300-level AT courses.

AT 403 — Athletic Training Clinical VI (4)

This is the final Clinical course for the student. At this time, final review of psychomotor skills will take place. The student will continue to be involved in providing health care for the patient under the direct supervision of a Preceptor. The student will also take several written, computer-based, and practical examinations in preparation for the national Board of Certification Exam. Content and review for these tests will be divided according to the domains of Athletic Training. Prerequisite: AT 402.

AT 422 — Organization & Administration of Athletic Training (3)

The student will gain an understanding of policies and procedures in operating an Athletic Training Facility or Sports Medicine Clinic. The student will learn how to: design an Athletic Training Facility, create a budget, organize pre-participation physical examinations, keep records, and understand legal considerations in Athletic Training. There will also be a considerable amount of time devoted to human resource management, computer-based information management, and insurance issues such as filing/tracking claims and third-party reimbursement. Prerequisite: Completion of all 300-level AT courses.

AT 445 — Pathology & Pharmacology in Athletic Training (3)

The student will learn the nature and causes of disease and how disease affects patients, with a focus on athletes. The effects of disease on the functions of tendons, ligaments, muscles, bones, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, and on athletic performance will be presented. The student will also study the effects of drugs on patients, with a focus on athletes. The student will gain an understanding of prescription vs. non-prescription drugs in the treatment of common athletic injuries and illnesses, performance-enhancing drugs/ergogenic aids, and currently banned drugs in athletics. Physiologic reactions and effects of drugs, diuretics, anabolic steroids, recreational drugs, drug testing programs, and safety precautions for the Athletic Trainer from a legal standpoint will be presented. The moral and ethical responsibility to intervene in situations where the use and/or abuse of legal or illegal drugs is suspected or known will be discussed. Prerequisite: Completion of all 300-level AT courses.

AT 460 — Current Trends & Topics in Athletic Training (3)

The student will investigate practices and procedures currently being applied in Athletic Training. The role of the Certified Athletic Trainer in relation to other allied health professionals will be explored. Current research and the implications for the Certified Athletic Trainer will be discussed. Prerequisites: AT 306 and AT 422.

AT 480 — Research Methods and Design in Athletic Training (3)

The student will learn the proper methods of designing, conducting, writing, and publishing research within the field of Athletic Training. Basic statistical analysis/interpretation relevant to Athletic Training will be presented, as will computerized record keeping and data collection. Computer literacy and current technology related to Athletic Training will be emphasized. Prerequisite: AT 445.

AT 497 — Independent Study (1-6)

Advanced projects in a specialized area of Athletic Training under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to juniors and seniors only with the permission of the Program Director.